Tiina Zilliacus: From the Security of Tech Giants to the Competitive World of Gaming

Tiina ZilliacusTiina Zilliacus’ last name brings to mind the long-gone days of gladiators and Greek warriors. And in many ways, the Finnish tech entrepreneur has launched herself into a battle of sorts. Leaving the security of the corporate world, with three years of hard work and preparation behind her, Zilliacus has suited up to enter the male-dominated fray of gaming. “What I have initiated is not currently in the scope of most game developers. Within the next five years, instead of Coke and pizza, I hope more of them will become genuinely interested in health. When this happens, we’ll be there with cool employee opportunities,” she adds with a smile.

Following the career path her parents valued, Zilliacus knew she would go work for the big brands. After receiving a business degree from the Helsinki School of Economics, Finland, the dutiful and driven daughter did just that and spent 11 years at the Finnish tech giants, Nokia and Sonera, focusing purely on business-to-consumer (B2C) services such as management of online shops. A consistent thread of supporting consumers in mobile, online and digital environments has run through all her positions.

And yet, despite a clear future of fulfilling and secure corporate opportunities, Zilliacus knew her personality type was meant more for the smaller start-up environment. “I’ve always had something of a fearless adventurer attitude and love a certain amount of risk, so by my early-to-mid 30s I started seeking out CEO roles in the start-up world.”

For the next five years, she moved seamlessly among three start-ups, one mobile phone photo and video service (Futurice) and two gaming firms (Apaja Online Entertainment and Ironstar Helsinki), where she was Managing Director and CEO, respectively.

During her corporate life and especially the stressful years of start-up management, Zilliacus turned to yoga as a form of release. “First it was just a hobby, but quickly became a way of life. I’ve always made time for yoga and been on a lot of retreats. I’m even certified as an instructor.”

The gaming sector in Finland, as in most places around the globe, is male-developer driven. While this bothered Zilliacus, who herself is not a developer, she saw a clear opportunity: “They make games that they would like to play although 55% of casual and mobile game customers are female. I realized that I actually could use my professional competence and understanding of what women like in terms of entertainment to fulfill the needs of a major target audience that the market was not addressing.”

Zilliacus decided to start a business driven by her own values and her devotion to yoga provided the spark of inspiration. “Not many people have the digital and management experience that I have and understand yoga and the well-being world as much as I do. I decide to merge my professional knowledge with my passion to create a gaming business targeting women 25 years and older.”

And so as the next iterative step in her career, she set out once again but this time to found her own gaming studio focusedTiina Zillacius on fun mobile “free2play” games aimed at women with the unique underlying theme of wellness.

The last three years have not been easy. They were spent building a strategy, laying the groundwork, seeking angel and seed investment, and recruiting former colleagues to the team. As the 40-year old Zilliacus explains: “I’ve been married to this company. It wakes up with me on Saturday morning, my weekends, my nights…when you are so invested in bringing something like this to life, you give up not only your time but your mind space. As a yogini and wellbeing enthusiast, it took me two years to accept that there is a time that I just need to let all of this happen to me even though it’s work. But because it relates so much to my personal experiences, I can never describe it as work. It will simply take as long as it takes as long as I am where I want to be. That’s the attitude and mental model I needed to adopt and once I did that, everything fell into place.”

But the hard work has paid off. Gajatri Studios’s first simulation or management game, Yoga Retreat, is just recently available from the Apple App Store. Along the lines of Animal Farm, the mechanics of the game are familiar. Zilliacus has intentionally aimed to keep it accessible and not so difficult that it becomes hostile for the user. Players can access yoga poses, unlock small daily meditations, and challenge friends as they manage, expand, and customize their very own yoga retreat on a paradise island.

Zilliacus’ company has attracted the support of two Finnish female angel investors and a family-owned investment office that are drawn in by the health features within games. Her two co-founders are from Rovio, the makers of Angry Birds: “Games guys are open minded. They like to do stuff that reaches out to people so the first motivation is that they like the plan that there is a different type of business strategy and therefore also leadership style in what you do”.

Gajatri Studios’ business model is sustainable and incorporates a wide theme of health and wellness that can molded into different content. Future games will look at food for instance and there is an opportunity for synergies with the forthcoming IOS8 platform and its Health Kit. “As the Apple platform evolves, we plan to utilize different opportunities in our games. For example, we could offer yoga challenges that we can verify have been completed because the user is wearing an iWatch or something like that. Essentially integrating some real life activity into a game, that’s the wider idea,” Zilliacus explains.

The female gaming entrepreneur, one of few in Finland, is optimistic of what lies ahead but acknowledges with these types of companies, funding must be sought out all the time. “It’s a continuous process and depending on which stage you are in, you know the sums are dependent on that. That’s part of the entrepreneurial life, until you are successful, you are every once in a while almost out of funding and when you are successful, you don’t need it any longer. You just need to go on until you reach that certain critical point.”

Zilliacus will know in a few weeks if she has hit that critical point as sales stats from Apple App Store are reported. But regardless the journey is what counts and of that she can surely be proud.

Tips from the Finnish gladiator of gaming:

  • Really be clear that the core of what you interested in is what you strive towards. It’s so much hard work to launch a business, make sure you like what you do and that you are good at it. Understand your strengths and weakness. If those elements are present, then it will be easier. Be grateful of what you get to do, not many people have the same opportunity.
  • Be persistent. Don’t get easily discouraged. There are so many people who are not going to help you, you need “sisu” (uniquely Finnish expression for grit) to get past the non-believers and be able to do things on your own. You won’t always get approval, but you must sustain.
  • Surround yourself with people with integrity.
  • Find a way to relax every day, clear your head in an efficient way. This enables you to focus on what is essential the next day.

Tracey Pontarelli: Honing Messages and Muscles – From Bold Brands to Buff Bodies

Tracey PonterelliTracey Pontarelli sweat her way through college – not because she was anxious over grades, but because she realized early on in life that working out was key to her happiness and overall well-being. “My husband jokes that I’m nicer when I’m working out, and I am.”

Despite her love of the gym and devotion to a healthy lifestyle, her desire to put her Seton Hall University joint degree in journalism and business to use was stronger than the call to make a career in fitness. And inspired by a fortuitous meeting with a PR big wig when she was in high school, she was led down a path to a career in Public Relations.

Pontarelli, a native of Coventry, Rhode Island, was awarded the prestigious Horatio Alger award during her senior year of high school. The award, which honors students who excel in spite of adversity, matched Pontarelli with Harold Burson, the founder of global PR giant, Burson Marsteller, as her mentor, a friendship that continues today. Known as the Godfather of modern PR, Burson looked at the practice almost as a science, coaching his staff to analyze how to influence their client’s target customers through a carefully constructed process.

Throughout college, Pontarelli maintained contact with Burson, and while he surely helped illustrate what a career in PR would look like, he never offered her a job upon graduation and – true to the spirit of Horatio Alger – she never asked for one. She wanted to earn her own way.

“I thought I wanted to go into PR, but I didn’t fully know what it was until I got into it.  Luckily it played to a lot of my strengths and I think I was meant to do it,” says Pontarelli. She landed her job first in New York City at Golin Harris and then at Ketchum PR first working on clients such as Nintendo, Evian, and Wisk Laundry Detergent.

As a counterbalance to the stressful working pace, Pontarelli continued her love affair with fitness and – spurred on by a YMCA director who was impressed with her natural ability to lead others – she got certified and taught fitness classes at the Hoboken, NJ, YMCA. By day, Pontarelli wrote corporate messaging and pitched reporters and led step classes by night. It was a balance that worked.

When her then boyfriend, now husband, moved to Boston, the moonlighting fitness instructor made another jump. This time she landed at Mullen PR and continued teaching at several gyms in the Boston area. Burson was there throughout as a sounding board. “He was just so amazing and told me to keep in touch, so I did, but neither of us ever discussed a job until I was ready to move back to NYC.”

At 26, the newly engaged Pontarelli returned to NYC, and now, with four years of PR experience under her belt, she was ready to show off her skills at her mentor’s namesake firm. Burson sent Pontarelli’s resume to the human resources department and Pontarelli did the rest. “Obviously it helps when Harold Burson calls you his protégé in public, but at that point in my career, I knew I would make him proud.”

She landed a position as a manager in the Consumer Brands division and started managing accounts ranging from Kellogg’s to Fidelity Investments.

Those who worked with Pontarelli understood that indeed she was destined for a career in PR – she thrived in the environment where she was able to creatively help clients through their communications’ challenges, while mentoring and training younger staff all while working towards the agency’s goals. The job was exciting and, at times, all consuming. Pontarelli worked her up way from Manager to Director and finally Managing Director.

Seven years, and two children later, Pontarelli got a wake-up call. It was a Saturday and she was heading into the office to finish a global new business proposal. “I got ready to hop out of the car, and my three year old said to me, ‘Happy Valentines Day, Mommy.’”

For Pontarelli, who loved her job, that was it. “You know that saying, ‘You can do it all, just not all at the same time’?  That was the moment I realized something had to give.”

She resigned from Burson, but continued to use her skills by launching a consulting business. She did PR and branding strategies for friends who were starting small businesses and for a group of former colleagues who needed outside help with bigger clients.

“The nice thing about working in PR is that your skills are really useful for a lot of things, so I was able to pick up a lot of work.”

In 2012, one of those friends, Catherine Goodwin, came to her for PR help for the new gym she was opening, Exceed Physical Culture. Pontarelli had long ago let her fitness certification expire, but she dove into the project helping with branding and media relations. Much like the YMCA Director 20 years earlier, Catherine recognized talent and encouraged the 41-year-old to get re-certified which she did, this time in group fitness and personal training.

“Even when I wasn’t teaching classes, I was sort of a ‘half teaching’ because I just naturally want to help other people through things … I’ve always loved group fitness because it’s motivating to be in settings with people who are struggling along with you, but I also find working one-on-one to be motivating.”

In addition to maintaining her PR consultancy, she now teaches at least two group fitness classes a week and coaches a set of at least six personal training clients at Exceed on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

While Pontarelli came full circle to fitness, this time around she’s using her PR skills to guide her through the process.

“One of the  first steps in PR is understanding your audience and getting to what someone’s true underlying motivations are – their anxieties and their desires.  That’s how we started every assignment at the agency, and that’s how I come at every single person I work with – what caused them to come in the first place and how do we get them to a place we want to be?”

Pontarelli, now a 44-year old mother of three, finds the work particularly gratifying when she’s coaching midlife women. “We’re really hard on ourselves as a gender, and I am passionate about the fact that women should focus on being strong, happy and supportive of each other. That’s what’s really important.”

Citing an email she had received that morning that boasted proven methods to shrink thigh fat, Pontarelli, not a fan of spot reduction, practically shrieks. “You are never going to have someone else’s body, but what you can have is a strong and healthy body and be proud of your workout. I try to get people to focus on that, and then the other stuff tends to fall into place.”

For women trying to get into the habit, Pontarelli suggests a fascinating book she read this year, The Power of Habit, which unlocks the secret of how habits are formed and broken… hint:  you have to replace a bad habit with something else to truly break it. But the upside to exercise? “The book has a whole section on it – exercise is a “keystone habit,” so when you exercise regularly, it creates other positive habits like eating better and working harder.”

The best part of Pontarelli’s Career 2.0? “I’m helping people, one on one. In consumer PR, I didn’t always feel this way – I was doing things that were fun and interesting, but now I feel like I’m really helping people and it’s very gratifying.”

While she continues to bring out the best in her clients, she’s working ceaselessly on herself as well. Next stop? Her first New York City Marathon.

Tips from Tracey Pontarelli

  • Do what you like and be open to where it leads you.  There are endless possibilities for you out there, but the right ones can be found where your passions lie.
  • Get out of your comfort zone. That is where Career 1.0 was. Career 2.0 is probably going to require a bit of a leap!
  • Believe in yourself. You are a capable, smart woman.  As one of my favorite instructors says, “Why not be this amazing?”  Why not indeed!

Dr Shami Feinglass: The Doctor of BMX

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Photo courtesy of Kay Ohta

Shamiram “Shami” Feinglass loves a challenge, and God help you if you think she’s not up to it. The five-foot-tall, mother-of-two medical doctor has, in the past year, added nationally ranked BMX racer to her resume, the perfect accompaniment to policy-maker, med tech executive, and public speaker.

“Frankly it all started as a lark, but by challenging myself I realized I can do it. And in doing the unexpected, I can be a role model for women and girls and an inspiration for others to take risk and own their choices. I can use myself as an example of attaining the seemingly unattainable. If Shami can do it, so can you!”

A native of San Francisco, Feinglass graduated from Smith College with an AB in Biochemistry. She was certain she would go on to study molecular biology but after one summer as an intern at Genentech, Inc, quickly realized that “I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life talking to rats.” After some soul-searching during that summer, she switched to health policy and became a lobbyist for a non-profit education association in DC.

Feinglass spent two years as a lobbyist working on health, education and computer technology issues. Attending many discussions on health policy, she found herself surrounded by lawyers. “I knew I had to go to medical school. If I was going to do a decent job in the field, I would have to become a physician policy-maker. There were just so many lawyers at the health table, but not a single doctor.”

So off she went to grad school at Emory University, getting a Masters in Public Health and continuing on to medical school. Throughout her grad school career, she stayed close to the policy community in DC, working with the Carter Center on the inclusion of mental health care in the Clinton healthcare reform package and with US Medical during the Olympic games in Atlanta. She moved to Portland, Oregon, to do her residency in internal medicine while simultaneously doing public health policy work at the state level, with a focus on teen health and prenatal care for pregnant migrant farm workers (yes, you read correctly, interning as a doctor and doing public policy work). From there, she moved to Seattle as part of the prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program to study access to mental health services for teens. “Most of my clinical time was spent in homeless teen clinics. It’s a population that has real promise if they can access the right services. I really felt I could affect more people in need if I helped the underserved and didn’t have to charge for my services or rely on the income.” Feinglass’ path became clearer to her after Seattle. From there, she entered the U.S. Public Health Service (the Surgeon General’s Corps) and then headed to Medicare where she felt she would make a difference as a physician policy-maker in government.

For the next seven years, she was responsible for making decisions on what Medicare would cover for seniors and the disabled across the US. It was during this time that she had her two children, and, just to keep things interesting, did a second residency in preventive medicine at Emory University. “So it’s not always the best of attributes that I strive for constant stimulation and fear boredom. I’ve always been interested in the learning curve and the challenge. Once I’ve mastered something, I’m interested in learning new things while I continue to focus on whatever that job is at that time.”

From Medicare, Feinglass moved to Zimmer, a large medical device company, as their VP Global Medical and Regulatory Affairs. “I went there because I was really attracted to the international business exposure and the opportunity to learn about non-US health systems,” she explains. Managing a large team on many continents and multiple time zones for 4.5 years was highly challenging but something was missing, “While I was senior enough to make decisions and help move the culture around, I wasn’t taking as much risk I wanted to,” Feinglass says, “so I took a pause. It was a bit scary but I wanted to take a self-imposed ‘time out’.”

The pause gave her time to explore something even the energetic doctor never imagined she’d take up.

While attending her 7-year-old son’s BMX event, Feinglass’ enthusiasm impressed a woman at the track who joked, “Why don’t you train to race BMX during your break from work? If you start now, you could compete next year.” Feinglass did a double-take and answered, “Are you crazy? I’m too old for crashing to a fiery ball of broken bones on a bike with no gears. And besides, I am super competitive so if I am going to do this, I need to be ready this summer.” The more she tried to convince the woman she wasn’t interested, the more she realized she was. The dearth of women in the sport made the challenge even more compelling.

In case, dear reader, you are not aware, Google defines BMX as “organized bicycle racing on a dirt track, especially for youngsters.” A “dead sailor” in BMX jargon is a jump gone wrong that might land you in the “melisha” but if you “kill” a “quarter pipe” and “shred” the competition you just might end up on the “X-Games” or nowadays even the Olympics. Got it?

With no time to lose, Feinglass started looking into how many races she would have to do to make sure she would place at the state and national level. It was doable. As a 45-year old woman, Feinglass got a kick out of the reaction from the competition when her name started appearing on boards before the race. “I loved the look on the boys’ faces when they would ask ‘Feinglass, who’s that guy?’ and I’d answer ‘Don’t worry, you’ll probably beat me but I’m still going to come up the track on your heels so watch out!’”

It was never quite a fair race for Feinglass but she has become a poster child of what is possible for women in their forties if they are willing to take a risk: “Whether they are boys or girls, the 17-year olds will lap you all the time! For me, it was all about showing that I could do it as an ‘old lady’ when I frankly had no right to be starting this sport at all. At least as a doctor, I can diagnose my own broken bones. It was a personal challenge and something I could do with my husband and son. But my daughter remains thus far unconvinced.”

And now Feinglass has made it her personal mission to get as many girls and women interested in the sport as possible. She approaches the mothers and sisters of the competitors at any track she races on asking if they want to give it a try and helps host girls-only days at her local track. Some of the moms have been inspired to give it a go. “Last week, a woman said to me ‘you know, Dr. Feinglass, I watched you on the track and I think you’re totally nuts but if you can do it, so can I.’ That has been the best part of all this. After only one year, we’ve seen more than double the number of females participating at our local track.”

Feinglass is currently ranked number 2 in her class in the state of Indiana. She competes nationally (and in Canada) and ranks in the top 30 of all female BMX racers in her category. “I haven’t heard from Go-Pro yet but I’m sure the call is coming,” she laughs.

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Photo courtesy of Kay Ohta

Although she raked in a whopping $24 in Pro-Am official winnings in her first year, surpassing the career earnings of her son and husband, Feinglass is not likely to make money from BMX racing. But the experience has been transformative and made her rethink what she wants to do next. “I will admit, it is amusing to me to be a middle-aged mom doing my children’s sports but it’s also the role model piece. I want my legacy to be that there are more women in leadership positions, not just in medicine and the corporate world but also in sport. If I can inspire women and girls just by seeing me on the track – and not always doing that well – to get out there and maybe even lead on that track one day…well that’s fabulous.  And I bet they will be leaders in other areas of their life too. I loved ballet as a child but with a little inspiration, maybe I would have loved judo!”

So, after a little personal research into what other non-traditional sports she could affect, she decided to start Tae Kwon Doe with her daughter. “I literally decided on a Friday to start and competed one week later, I won my group!” OK, full disclosure, all three white belts – Feinglass, an 8-year old boy, and a 10-year-old girl – got medals.

As she considers her next career move, at the very least Feinglass has great fodder for her public-speaking events. Regardless of where she lands, she’s committed to pushing boundaries for women. She tells you straight up, “Hey, this totally middle-aged, not-very-athletic doctor took up BMX racing one year ago and now she’s a state champ. What do you want to do today?”

Tips from Dr Shami Feinglass:

  • Try to widen your comfort zone. Be ready to take on more risk.  Be comfortable with some level of chaos and uncertainty.
  • Don’t rush to take the first job that comes your way. Try to understand how the job fits into your legacy versus how your legacy fits with job.
  • Thinking and transformation come from taking a pause.

Do you have some suggestions for the next Feinglass sports challenge? Leave your comments below.

Julie Eisenberg: Letting Community Guide Career

JE profileRemember those friends in college who incited envy because they had their career path all worked out … in eighth grade?  Well, relax. That’s not Julie Eisenberg.  “I had no plan,” she shares. “Really, no plan! I don’t think I ever thought about the future when I was in college, or even now,” she insists.

But despite her claim that she was never one to look to the future, when you listen to her story it’s clear that she always paid attention to the, perhaps subconscious, need for community participation in her schooling and career choices. Lending her voice and skills to those in need and helping build communities is a thread that’s woven throughout her varied career, one that goes from union organizer to yoga studio owner.

In the early eighties, after the Linguistics and Women Studies major graduated from the University of Wisconsin, Eisenberg spent a year backpacking through South America, getting up close and personal with the people and politics she had been studying the past four years. Her attachment to the region deepened and she headed back to Madison, Wisconsin, to add a Master’s Degree in LatAm studies to her resume. Shortly thereafter, she returned to South America, this time to Chile.

Eisenberg cites a string of family and friend influences that led her to work in the union movement but it was her own experiences that played the biggest role. “I got a job on campus my freshman year at Madison and signed my first union card then,” she says. She felt strongly about the issues and felt close to that community. So when she went back to Chile, she landed a job as a community organizer, where she began to hone the skills she had begun to develop in her union.

“By the time I came back to the States three years later, I had been a card-carrying member of a union for years,” she added. “So it seemed like a natural fit to take a position as a union organizer for a teachers’ assistant union.”

She was young and had lots of energy for the job and she excelled at it. She would stick with this career for nearly 20 years. After five years in Millwaukee, where she worked for teachers’ and other unions, she was offered a job in DC working for a division of the AFL-CIO that represented some of their affiliate unions. Her division assisted unions seeking analytic research to secure financial data and anything else necessary to make their case in negotiations.

“It was a fantastic job. I loved it, but it was also very high pressure.”

Eisenberg was on the road a lot, working long hours, and representing everyone from airline to healthcare workers, but she spent the most time with meatpackers.

As real evidence of her passion for worker’s rights, the life-long vegetarian worked with the meatpackers union for years fighting for better work conditions. “It was challenging for me for sure. The smell of death around the meatpacking plant is brutal, but it’s a horrifically dangerous job for the workers and there are lots of injuries. When you talk about workers that need a union, meat and poultry workers are at the top of the list.”

Eisenberg’s Spanish-speaking skills were vital to help her communicate with many workers and get a real sense of the conditions. Despite the long hours and challenging conditions, Eisenberg didn’t consider a change. “That would have involved thinking about the future,” she jokes. Instead, she found another outlet – yoga.

Soon after she moved to DC, Eisenberg reluctantly started practicing yoga thanks to “a hippie neighbor from California who taught classes out of her apartment.”  The natural athlete was skeptical at first: “I sort of went kicking and screaming … there was lots of stretching and I wondered if it was really doing anything, but I kept going back.”

After four years of practicing yoga, she realized she was getting more serious when she sought out classes on the road while traveling for work.

“I went to a class in Omaha, Nebraska, once that I loved. It totally resonated with me. I also had a teacher in North Carolina. I was practicing all over the place.”  So, Eisenberg began taking teacher-training modules on weekends and immersion yoga weekends whenever her schedule allowed.

Upon moving to the Petworth neighborhood of DC, she found a new studio teaching Kundalini yoga. “It beat the crap out of me,” Eisenberg recalls. “It worked on postures but also a lot of breathing and chanting. It was very powerful and different from anything I had ever done. I found it so challenging but I loved it.”  She loved it so much she became certified as a Kundalini teacher.

It was right around this time that Eisenberg’s longtime employer decided he needed a change. “He was a wonderful boss and had given me so much opportunity, but when he decided to shut down the office, I realized I was tired too, and I didn’t want to go work for another union. It had been nearly 20 years and these campaigns really sap you.”

So Eisenberg decided she was just going to teach yoga and see where it led her.

“The financial transition? Oh my gosh — it was crazy. The things you take for granted when you have a full-time job, like going out to dinner, that all had to go, but the teacher training itself is powerful and gives you the sense that you can go off in a different direction and make it work.”

Eisenberg, who was single at the time, realizes she was very lucky to have severance and unemployment to get over the transition hump. She had a very low mortgage which was also a help but, “without the severance, I don’t think I would have been able to make a go of just teaching.”

It was just enough of a cushion to give her a couple months to develop a steady slate of classes.  She picked up students whenever she could at a variety of locations and then – fortuitously – a friend who worked at Miriam’s Kitchen called and asked if she’s be willing to teach yoga to the homeless there. She loved the volunteer time trying to “bring a little bit of peace and tranquility into the lives of the homeless men and women.”

It was through her work there that she connected with another instructor who was launching a non-profit to provide outreach yoga to underserved areas. Eisenberg was offered the executive director position and took it. Finally, through the combination of the office and the teaching jobs, she felt like she was back on her feet. But fundraising, a key part of her new job, was not really a natural fit. So, eighteen months later when a friend mentioned a space in Petworth that would be perfect for a yoga studio, she jumped at the chance.

Eisenberg initially partnered with a friend, but now runs Lighthouse Yoga Center on her own. At first, the overhead and rent were low, so the transition was smooth. After two years in the first location, she has moved the studio to a more central space in Petworth and expanded its offerings.

And in a way, Eisenberg has come full circle: no longer an official community organizer, her business has become the heart of her community: “My favorite thing right now about running Lighthouse is that we are becoming a great part of the community. Our students say all sorts of people feel comfortable coming here and we take that role seriously. We want to be there for the people in our neighborhood, providing a break from the stress of everyday.”

 

Tips from Julie Eisenberg:

  • Let go of your material needs. Stop shopping for things that aren’t critical, for example.
  • Develop a good network of friends and colleagues who will support you in your new venture. Don’t be shy about emailing them to invite them to classes or events.
  • Don’t get overly hung up on how much income you need to bring in each month. Build a little cushion and then realize that some months may be better than others, so you can make it through the slower months without freaking out.
  • In fact, try not to freak out in general. Everything works out in the end.

Lisa Allen and Trish Drennan: Friends, Partners, and Sweat Gurus

BBF co-ownersFor Lisa and Allen and Trish Drennan, it took a dramatic life event to make them recognize it was time for a change in their personal and professional lives. For both, the death of a mutual friend was a wake-up call that brought them together to support each other in becoming healthy and strong and to make it their lives’ work to help others to do the same.

A graduate of the University of Delaware, Lisa Allen had had a long-term career in communications, representing various trade associations in D.C. The work was interesting – everything from issues management to crisis communications – but when she had her first child at age 31, she decided it was time to work for herself and “own” her time a bit more. For years after she hung her own PR shingle, she found herself being able to devote more time to working out, something that had played an important role in her life since graduating from college.

Allen remembers herself as a chubby kid, who put on even more weight in college. “I had an “a-ha” moment soon after I graduated and realized I needed to do something different. I started running a lot and lost the college weight and was actually pretty proud of the fact that I got and stayed fit. Ever since then, exercise has become a real passion of mine.”

But Allen never really intended to make a career out of her love of health and fitness until she met Trish Drennan.

Drennan also worked in the field of communications after an unexpected detour as an engineer. After graduating from Wittenberg University with a degree in international relations, she thought she would pursue a career on Capitol Hill.  But when she found herself jobless between election cycles, a temporary job launched her into a new career as a wireless technology expert.

“I got placed at this technical engineering company, and it was at the time when wireless was really booming. It was a brand new trade so the company invested in training us. Within a year, I went from being a liberal arts girl to a wireless engineer trainee at George Washington University.”

Soon, Drennan was shipped off to Germany and found herself designing wireless networks for LCC International. She stayed there for almost five years but when the company decided to go public, they looked internally for people who understood good communications in addition to the technical side of the business. Drennan found herself tapping into those liberal arts skills in the sales and marketing department and later in investor relations.

In all, she spent nearly 22 years at LCC, eventually managing a team of 300 communications professionals around the world.

But with each promotion, the former college athlete found her commitment to fitness woefully waning.

“Once I started working, I went hard and heavy into my career. Unlike Lisa, I never had a weight problem until I had kids. By the time my third child was a year old, I was 45–50 pounds overweight. I was travelling internationally, juggling the needs of three kids and had a husband who also had a big job. It was a crazy time in my life and I was really soul-searching.’”

Although she was coaxed into contracting with the company to help them through another transition, Drennan, like Allen, decided to go out on her own. Now that she too owned her time, she started working out on a regular basis with her new friend.

In the Fall of 2009, for Drennan’s 40th birthday, the two decided to train for a marathon.  With loads of time to chat during long training runs, the “what if” conversations intensified as the pair discussed how they might make a go of it in the fitness industry.

During that time, a friend who ran a local boot camp in Ashburn invited Allen and Drennan to help her run the boot camp a couple mornings a week.  This was the opportunity they had been looking for – running an already established fitness class and seeing how it went.  At this point, the two friends had become such health and fitness junkies that they not only ran marathons but also competed in triathalons and spent the rest of their spare time reading up on the latest health, nutrition, and fitness trends. Drennan had lost forty pounds and was feeling fabulous, and Allen was determined to continue to help other people meet their fitness goals.

So donning their marketing hats again, the pair branded their own boot camp, Motiv8Me, and launched a new program.

“My husband joked that I went from an expensive clothing habit to an expensive equipment habit,” said Drennan.

In March of 2010, they launched the business with eight clients, each of whom had to commit to an eight-week session. It was important to them that their customers follow through with their commitment to the program and their own personal goals. The closer they worked with their clients and researched what was out there, they more realized they had hit on an idea that added value in the fitness world. “As students in lots of fitness classes ourselves, we were really frustrated with the fact that you could be doing moves wrong to the point of hurting yourself, but no one would tell you because the group fitness instructor was incentivized to come in and teach, not to take care of the people.”

Allen and Drennan took their plan a step further and became certified fitness instructors, quickly realizing what they really wanted was not just a boot camp, but a full-service gym that was different from any of the other fitness offerings available. Something that would offer everything they had learned and believed was critical to a lifetime of fitness – high intensity interval training, core work, strength training, and yoga. On top of that, they wanted a gym that didn’t sell shakes or powders or any hint that weight could fall off easily with short cuts. “Although we are not certified nutritionists, we wanted a gym where we could talk with clients about the importance of long-term good nutrition habits, and where we would commit to them if they would commit to the program,” explains Drennan.

With those goals, the pair came up with a tagline that would be the centerpiece of their gym:  Sweat. Nourish. Commit.

Again, the fitness junkies found themselves leaning on the skills they honed in their former lives to ensure their new venture was a success. “We really come into this industry from a very different perspective. Most people who want to open gyms are former trainers, but we take a business perspective. We wrote a business plan, we did a competitive analysis, we knew how much money we had to raise to make it work.”

They opted to turn to their own families to borrow the money rather than taking out a small business loan.  Each side put in equal amounts, and Allen and Drennan have opted not to take a salary until the loans are mostly paid back. They also decided to rebrand the company to something stronger and came up with BlackBench Fit, in reference to the eight black workout benches they purchased during their earlier outdoor bootcamp days.

Three years later, and BlackBench Fit is humming along and the two are ahead of schedule based on the original projections in their business plan.  “We were able to make a small dent into loan repayment this year, AND put a little bit of money each into our 401ks.”

But more than feeling satisfied at their business savvy, Allen and Drennan count it a blessing that they’ve been able to launch careers in a field that is so meaningful to them.

“One of the most rewarding parts of our job is also the most surprising,” shares Trish. “I had no idea I had a teacher or a therapist in me, but I love that part of the job.”

“I feel like what we’re doing now is a real calling for me,” adds Lisa. “It’s so gratifying to help people reclaim their bodies because I’ve been there and know what it’s like.”

Have questions for the owners of BlackBench Fit on their success to date? Write a comment and we’ll be sure they see it.

Dr Kelly McNelis: From Coal Miners to Crockpots, Finding Your Passion Early On

Kelly McNelisMany of us can remember the doubts we had early on in our careers – the feeling we might be pursuing the path of stability at the expense of following our passion. Dr Kelly McNelis was lucky. She decided to forgo the safe and well-worn path while she was still young enough to enjoy the rewards that come with doing something you love. After just a little more than a decade in her first career, the 32-year-old chose to ignore her inner fears and follow her gut — giving up a lucrative government research position to go out on her own as a wellness coach… and, to her own great surprise, also, something of an internet star.

The Pittsburgh native’s determination is a key asset in her road to success. “I was one of those kids who always knew what they wanted to do. I’ve wanted to be a psychologist for such a long time, at least from middle school when I really understood what a career was. I still have a paper about my career plans I wrote in 9th grade honors English,” McNelis recalls.

With a degree in Psychology from Penn State University, McNelis went to grad school at the University of Rochester, where she studied for free by committing to the PhD program up front. She graduated early with a PhD in social-personality psychology which studies the average functioning person and tries to understand why people do the things they do. “It fascinated me because I was learning about everyone I knew. I combined my studies with my passion for exercise and healthy living. I tried to understand what motivates people to exercise, why they make New Years’ resolutions about getting fit and what keeps them going past the end of January!”

Looking to return to Pittsburgh, she found a research job at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) working on a team with other social scientists. Much of the worked centered around the study of underground coal miners and how to keep them safe and healthy. McNelis did a lot of lab work and conducted on-site research.

McNelis worked at NIOSH for three years, but frankly it was a slog. “It was not my thing, despite loving psychology, I wasn’t doing work that I was passionate about. Basically, it was a trade-off. I stayed there because it was a really flexible job: I could work from home, it was stable, and paid well. But I kept asking myself, ‘Why did I devote nine years to studying in order to end up working in a career that I didn’t love?’ I realized I was too young to give up. I felt like a ‘sell out’.”

Having her second daughter cemented the decision to leave. “I was trading all these hours away from my children, spending them on something I didn’t like. I wanted to continue working but I needed to feel the passion.”

And so McNelis decided not to return to NIOSH after maternity leave. When she called to inform her manager about her decision, he shared one last bit of info that tempted her to stay. “I was originally hired as a Fellow. When I broke the news he offered me a long-term position and a promotion to permanent staff with a salary increase. My head said yes but my heart said no.”

Very nervous as she hung up the phone, McNelis thought she was making a huge mistake. But her family and friends stood by her decision. “My husband was McNelis Familygreat. He knew something would turn up, and we honestly believed it was a good time for a transition.”

While contemplating if teaching would be an option, McNelis found herself fascinated by an article her mother-in-law had sent with a note “thought of you”. It featured a woman who had started a business as a wellness coach. “I always I thought I would start my own business, but that it would be later in life when I had more experience and was older and wiser. But at that moment, I really felt ‘now is the time.’”

McNelis enrolled in 12-week certification with WellCoaches®, with the goal of opening her own coaching business for the average person desiring better habits. “Maybe they want to just eat better, exercise or lose weight, or even get the confidence to start a business like me. It would be an opportunity to combine my psych background with my passion for health and I immediately decided to target new moms who could use the advice of someone at the same stage in life but with a PhD in psychology!”

She started building New Leaf Wellness gradually. “My husband made a fabulous site for the business,” said McNelis (yes, she really appreciates her beau). She hired someone else to create a logo, and her uncle, a lawyer, helped her file as an LLC within a matter of months. She leaned heavily on social media to drive interest in her business and wrote a blog for new moms to drive traffic to her site. “The blog, advice and all the easy recipes I was offering were really a free way to support the women I wanted to coach.”

McNelis admits she was a bit naïve about the number of clients she expected to see coming through the door. But while the coaching side was slow to shift, other parts of the business started taking off in unexpected ways. “My blog gained traction and I started writing e-cookbooks. One article I wrote to promote my cookbook, 15-Minute Freezer Recipes went viral…it just blew up!” With 150K page views in one day and thousands of cookbook sales, this was all the reassurance McNelis needed to know she was headed in the right direction. “All my hard work was paying off. I had spent a year-and-a-half writing my blog and months paying my babysitter more than what I was making,” she laughs.

Where did the recipes come from? “I made them up! When I was pregnant, I would have loved some recipes to stock my freezer before the baby came. There’s a couple of breakfasts, lunches, cookies…I made them over and over again until I thought they were perfect.”

It’s been six months and another baby since McNelis’ post went viral. She has since published her third cookbook on crockpot recipes and continues to make a steady income blogging about recipes and wellness. And she couldn’t be happier, “I share my passions for food and healthy living with other moms.  I’m able to be home with my daughters and devote my time working to a career that I love. I am living my best life now. This is it. My best day is today.”

Tips from Dr Kelly McNelis

  • You cannot create demand. I might think every mom needs to work with a wellness coach, but it doesn’t matter what I think.  You can only try to identify the demand and then try to figure out how to fill it.
  • Don’t let your fears hold you back.  Think of fear as a signal that something is important to you. Embrace the fear that you feel about making a career change or building your business and know that your passion for it will help you to be successful in the long run.
  • Stop living your life for tomorrow.  Don’t spend all of your time thinking about the future or what you’re doing to do with it.  Start living for today.  Enjoy the here and now.  Celebrate how far you’ve come and finish each day happy and grateful for where you are.

Questions for Kelly? Write in the Comments section and we’ll be sure you get a reply.

Christine Bienvenu: Reinvention in the Face of Adversity

CB profileIf it takes a special kind of woman to stand up to breast cancer, remain positive, question experts’ recommendations, and take control of her own care, then surely it takes an extraordinary woman to turn the whole experience into a career opportunity. Meet Christine Bienvenu.

At a time when most teenagers are contemplating college options, the then-17-year-old Bienvenu moved from Montreal, Canada, to Switzerland. In the land of Emmental cheese and punctuality, she had the opportunity to do an apprenticeship directly after high school. “Not everyone is made to sit in a classroom, the hands-on experience is very valuable for a lot of young people trying to figure out what they want to do with their lives. It worked for me,” Bienvenu notes.

Already fluent in English, she requested to substitute the language class requirement with a volunteer opportunity. She worked at a local senior center and liked it so much that she realized she wanted to continue the work outside of mandatory class hours. “I felt like a fish in water,’” Bienvenu recalls. After high school graduation, she signed up for a 3-year apprenticeship in a nursing home. And for the next 15 years, worked as a social activities coordinator in three different nursing homes, at one of which she met her husband, Alain. “In case you are wondering, he was the chef, not a patient. Who says exciting things don’t happen in nursing homes?” jokes Bienvenu.

In support of Alain’s long-time dream to open a restaurant, Bienvenu took a break to support him. Together, they worked a grueling 16–18-hour days, 6 days a week. “It was struggle, especially with a small child, and not particularly rewarding as the income was just enough to cover our expenses. We went into it a little too wide-eyed and optimistic.” So after two years, they decided to let go of the dream.

Bienvenu returned to the eldercare sector and found a job again as an activities coordinator, which she held for five years until a restructuring was announced. Her new contract required her to work irregular shifts. Her husband, head chef at a restaurant in Lausanne, also works non-standard hours. Between them, they agreed it would be impossible to manage the hours and two young children, so Bienvenu demurred, “I saw it as a sign to take a break and stay home with my little ones.”

And then came the terrible news. With no familial history of breast cancer and only 35 years old at the time, Bienvenu was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Considering her age, they had to move fast. Within one month of the diagnosis, Bienvenu underwent a tumorectomy in her right breast in hopes of saving it. Another month later, she started 18 weeks of highly aggressive chemo. Unfortunately, the tumorectomy revealed that her entire right breast had pre-cancerous cells and so she ultimately decided to undergo a bilateral mastectomy with immediate reconstruction. “It was a pretty intense time. When you are on the wrong side of the statistics, you just go with what you’ve got. You don’t really have a choice. I was ‘out to lunch’ for several days after chemo treatments and the children were so young. My husband, sisters, and mother had to pick up the pieces.”

At the time of her treatment, many of the cancer resources available for women suffering TNBC were targeted at older women, and Bienvenu had a hard time finding helpful advice. “The issues facing older women with cancer – not to detract from that – are very different. They don’t tend to have young children at home. The issues between husband and wife are not the same at 55 or 60 versus 35 years.”

She also found the Swiss support group meetings she attended to be anything but supportive. Generally Swiss people and are not known for their willingness to question authority. “I found everyone to be so passive in the discussion. It was always, ‘Well, my doctor says this…my doctor has it under control … But I’m not a passive person! I’m a proactive person, I like to get answers and do things for myself.”

Frustrated by the lack of information and the “old-school paternalistic approach” and knowing that she was not the only young cancer survivor in Switzerland with different needs, Bienvenu struck out to find like-minded people, women and men who would understand her. “I needed to find people who were like me, going through what I was going through, and with whom I could discuss things I couldn’t speak about with my family for fear of hurting or scaring them.”

She turned to the internet, specifically online cancer communities or forums and social media. What she found was very helpful and guided discussions she had with her oncologist. She questioned some of the advice she was given and started seriously considering a double mastectomy after she read that TNBC could be more effectively treated by removing all of the breast tissue. “I respect doctors but they are only human. Several heads thinking together on how to tackle a problem is better than one. There is a need to be more critical of traditional treatments. For me, it made perfect sense, the more I take off, the less chance I have of relapse.”

Her oncologist was not in favor and the surgeon was up in the air, so the no-nonsense Bienvenu got a second opinion from a Professor at the breast center in Lausanne, who also thought the double mastectomy was the better option. After weighing the pros and cons, the fact that there was no way to detect pre-cancerous cells made Bienvenu decide to err on the side of caution and undergo a double mastectomy. The dread of wondering whether the left breast would also one day present with TNBC won out over keeping it.

Through it all, she remained active on social media and maintained contact with people in the breast cancer community abroad. Although the online resources were remarkably helpful, they were targeted at a North-American audience. “It was very healing for me, but when it came to ‘translating’ all the advice to my context, I started to see the gaps. While the issues may be the same, the Swiss way of handling them is not. Much of the information on protocols, insurance, doctors’ approaches, financial aid and so on is quite different.”

And so the seed was planted for Seinplement Romand(e)s – an online breast cancer platform across social media – and in it, Bienvenu found her calling. If she could not find the support she needed, she would create it – as much for herself as for others. It was not going to be easy as the Swiss, even today, are apprehensive of social media.

To help get started, the resourceful Bienvenu turned to the Swiss disability insurance program for assistance in job retraining. It was clear she would not be able to return to her profession due to physical limitations that would restrict her from pushing wheelchairs, lifting elderly patients, and the like. At first, officials resisted. “They wanted me to train to be an office manager as they didn’t see the benefit in social media training. It was only the beginning of many battles I would have.” But Bienvenu was tenacious and finally won them over. She received financial support for a 1-year program in social media and online communities, which she started in 2012.

With her health back on track, she threw herself into her classes, “I absolutely loved everything about the courses. I finally found where I was supposed to be and it felt great to feel professionally competent again!” Her thesis was essentially the business plan of Seinplement Romand(e)s. The platform merges many channels of communication and is a place where French-speaking people can come to find information and support, share experiences, and exchange ideas with other patients about their situation. It is open to both men and women (thus the “e” in parenthesis indicating the feminine noun). “I wanted to make it inclusive because not only do men suffer from breast cancer directly, but they are usually the ones left keeping the household and family going while the woman is going through treatments or recovering.”

It hasn’t been an easy ride, but the resilient Bienvenu continues to push on. Two weeks before she presented her thesis defense for her diploma, she relapsed and had to start another 15 rounds of chemo and radiotherapy. Offline she reached out to lot of associations and women’s groups to try and broaden the community across Switzerland’s six French-speaking cantons. “That was a frustrating experience. Decision-making in Switzerland is highly centralized. There are 26 cantons, each with its own cancer organization. I got the same answer from everyone I approached: ‘Oh, that’s an interesting idea, but social media? We are not ready for that.’ But then my thesis advisor suggested – instead of going top down – to create the community from the bottom up. And so that’s what I did.”

And finally, the “top” is noticing and coming to her. Her community is growing all the time and Bienvenu has become very active in the whole Health 2.0 for French-speaking Switzerland and France. She will speak at Doctors 2.0 & You this summer and works in collaboration with the Geneva and Lausanne University hospitals on various 2.0 projects. She was chosen to translate Dave DeBronkart’s book Let Patients Help! in French. “Social media has enabled me to meet fascinating people that I wouldn’t otherwise have been able to meet and to get involved in incredible projects that I could never have imagined. It’s ironic that being so ill has enabled me to find skills I never knew I had, and invest in a passion that would grow into a career.”

Disability pension is a key form of support for Bienvenu and has enabled her to keep Seinplement Romand(e)s independent. “I want this neutrality so it can be open to everyone. I could probably cash in, I live in the country of pharmaceuticals after all! But right now, I am satisfied with the recognition that I am helping others. But honestly, it’s not even really the recognition. I do it for the community. I’ve made some wonderful friends, the journey has just become so fascinating. Who would have thought?”

Christine Bienvenu Tips for Surviving Tough Times:

  • Have confidence in yourself and your gut feeling. Trust that above all! You can respect experts in the field, be they in the medical sector or otherwise, but your own personal experience counts for a lot.
  • It’s OK to take no for answer as long as you have a valid and logical explanation why the answer is “no”, otherwise keep pushing.
  • In my situation, educating myself was crucial for me to stay strong and be considered an equal partner in my care. This can be applied to any situation really. No one can know everything, stay humble, and bring knowledge to the table.

Have questions for Christine Bienvenu? Post a comment and we’ll make sure she sees it. You can follow Christine on Facebook.

Erja Järvelä: From Nokia Logistics Wiz to Shamanic Energy Healer

rsz_erjahankoAs a child, Erja Järvelä wanted to be a doctor. The dream of healing people stayed with the Finn all the way through high school, but died a quick death during the college application process. Suddenly, finding herself driven by other people’s expectations rather than passion, she switched from medicine to law, “I was convinced I was making a practical decision. I never thought I would become a lawyer in the traditional sense, but I was sure it would provide a good foundation for whatever I wanted to do.”

She wasn’t wrong on that count. Along with a law degree from the University of Helsinki, Järvelä picked up an International MBA from the University of San Diego. On returning to Finland, she began working as a logistics coordinator for Nokia, the Finnish technology giant. “Logistics is a great way to learn the ABCs of a company. You get to see the bones and learn a lot about the business.”

Shipping to and dealing with China regularly, Järvelä gained notoriety in the firm and was internally headhunted to head up logistics there. Based in Beijing, she was responsible for mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. It was tough job, but offered lots of experience and leadership challenges.

After a two-year stint in Asia, Järvelä returned to Finland, where she established and ran various logistics organizations at Nokia for a further ten years. In 2007, Nokia Networks underwent a merger with Siemens and all Nokia employees had to reapply for their positions. Järvelä was asked to head up the trade compliance organization with direct reports all over the globe. She hesitated: “I was already 42 and had a strong feeling I would like to do something else with my life. I was pretty tired, but then this opportunity came and I just thought it would be stupid not to take it.”

She stayed for a further three stressful years before the company, feeling pressure from its not-so-successful merger, began offering voluntary exit packages. She jumped! “I was the first one there in the line … Hand in the air shouting ‘I will, I will!’ I had zero hesitation. I just knew if I didn’t leave then, I never would. I had no plans and no clue what I would do, I just knew I had to switch for my own sake.”

A lot of people criticized her decision. “I was alone with my daughter, Ronja, and many detractors said ‘How can you do it? You’re a single mom, thereHiihto is so much risk involved.’ But I decided to trust that things will turn out for the best,” she recalls.

She took one year off and put thoughts of her future aside. “I just wanted to do things I enjoy, unravel from the stress, and live simply.” She travelled with Ronja and joined the uniquely Finnish kapua community, which combines climbing and charity work for people who want to challenge themselves. And then, to the surprise of many, mother and daughter moved to Lapland, Finland’s northern-most region, for the winter … an adventure not for the faint-hearted. “While Ronja attended a small Lapp school, I immersed myself in nature, skied, and did snowshoe walking and climbing. When the temperatures were too low for even the bravest soul to venture outside, -30 °C (-22°F), I hunkered down with the local old ladies and learned how to knit and weave rugs. It was a great time for reflection.”

Upon returning to Helsinki, Järvelä was still unsure of the direction she should take. “I was asking the universe, ‘Please tell me what I should do?’” It wasn’t long before she got an answer.

During her stint in Lapland, the recovering corporate executive had been writing a blog about what it was like to be a member of society without a title or job. A blog follower contacted her with a suggestion that she check out a holistic well-being school in NY. As soon as she googled the Institute of Integrative Nutrition and read its mission of improving health and happiness, she knew she had found what she was looking for. “I had always been interested in helping people. At work, I thrived on supporting people in their jobs, pushing them to do better and guiding them through the organizational messes we experienced in the workplace. I signed up immediately.”

IIN proved extremely helpful. The one-year distance learning program on holistic well-being, offered Järvelä guidance on possible career directions and how to turn her passion for health, coaching and wellness into a job. After graduation, she was drawn to a local class on energy healing using ancient Peruvian spiritual and ceremonial traditions.

The shamanic energy medicine class was a revelation as Jarvelä explains, “I knew immediately I had found my home. I suddenly arrived somewhere I had been searching all my life. It was so familiar to me.” With no hesitation she enrolled in a one-year program where she learned how to understand and work with realms and dimensions of time and space other than what we in the West are traditionally taught.

Today Järvelä is a health coach and energy healer. Through her practice, Mixing Nuts, she works with clients who are “stuck” or carry a heavy burden. “When an individual can’t make progress, energy is trapped in the body. I help them release the tension and often work on erasing the unneeded blueprints they carry in their energetic bodies. Also, imagine, for example, a machine that is not functioning properly because some parts are missing. I help find those parts, what we in the ‘business’ refer to as lost soul parts, and bring them back to make the person feel whole again.”

ErjanauraaDoes she ever regret not finding her calling sooner? “Everything comes in the right time, I have no regrets. All my experiences were because I needed them, ” the Finn explains.

Not only does Järvelä help others recover their energy but she too is energized by her work, “I feel completely fulfilled, I enjoy it so much when I see how the process helps people. It’s transformational.” And after all those years of corporate stress, it looks like the energy healer has come full circle and finally become the “doctor” she always wanted to be.

Interested in shamanism? Read more on Erja’s blog mixingnuts.blogspot.fi  and, for our Finnish readers, erjanblogi.blogspot.fi. You can also sign up for a monthly newsletter in English http://mad.ly/signups/60167/join

Erja Järvelä’s tips:

  • Listen to yourself. It is so important to “quiet a bit down” so you can hear yourself. I wasn’t able to hear “me” when I was working. I was so busy that I heard neither myself nor anything else. Give time for being and not performing.
  • Don’t believe what you think, as the saying goes. We are taught to think and act in certain ways that often restrict us from being our true selves. Society, culture, family, history, norms … you name it. Be brave enough and question. Bringing stuff to your conscious level, is a key to rewriting your life script as you want it to be.

 

Discussion

Have you ever visited an energy healer to experience transformation and uncover insights in an effort to find your passion?

Lisa Eaves: Finding Zen

lisa eaves

Looking back at her younger self, Lisa Eaves realized she was a leader by example and pretty good at motivating others. Naturally athletic, she could relax, enjoy team sports, and play well. “Encouraging others, building their confidence and having fun helped everyone to play better. In sports, you learn about yourself, your role on a team, build mental skills, learn about strategies… the skills and experience I gained were a great foundation for any chosen profession.”

But Lisa was surprised when she fell into a career as an IT specialist. “Technology did not come naturally to me. I had to work hard to understand it, unlike technologists for whom the bits and bites made perfect sense.” After earning a BSc in business from the University of Maryland, Lisa secured her first job managing contracts for a consulting firm before moving to Fannie Mae where she spent the next 12 years. She moved up in the ranks, working long hours, which came with higher salaries but not more satisfaction. She liked working at Fannie Mae. The people were great. But she didn’t love going to work every day. It wasn’t fulfilling. It was a high-stress, demanding environment, and Lisa paid the price in terms of personal freedom and happiness. She toyed with the idea of acupuncture as a means to reduce her stress but never thought of it in terms of a career choice. She knew she needed to do something different but what? (more…)